Has Your Spouse Committed A Fraudulent Conveyance Of Property?

Connecticut law declares that all property owned by two people in a marriage is considered marital property, unless it has been specifically separated by a prenuptial or postnuptial agreement. This affects everything you own, regardless of whether you owned it prior to getting married.

One or both members of a couple may opt to transfer some of their property or assets to a friend or family member in order to protect them in a divorce. Doing this is a violation of state law.

At The Prince Law Group, we have extensive experience in dealing with situations involving fraudulent conveyance of property. Our attorneys know the law and how to apply it to your situation. If your spouse has tried to protect property or assets by "selling" them or giving them away so that you do not get your share of their value, we will pursue the value of those assets as part of your divorce proceedings.

What Can You Do To Help Me?

Our lawyers will file a motion with the courts to make them aware of your spouse's fraudulent behavior. If your situation involves a piece of real estate, we can file a lis pendens against the property to protect your rights to part of its value. This ensures that the value of the house is considered in your property division.

We will protect your rights and your interests in this matter, whether your spouse intentionally or unintentionally failed to list this asset as marital.

Make Sure All Of Your Marital Property Is Considered

Call The Prince Law Group, LLC, in Stamford, Connecticut, at 203-977-3700 or contact us online to schedule your complimentary consultation with one of our lawyers.