Connecticut’s Governor, Ned Lamont, has issued several executive orders designed to slow down the transmission of COVID-19 as much as possible. One of those executive orders temporarily* authorizes the use of “communication technology” to notarize documents. Remote notarizations are now allowed in Connecticut, but the following conditions MUST be met:

  • The communication technology must allow the signer and the notary to communicate at the same time by sight and sound;
  • The signer must show proof of identity, unless personally known to the notary, in the form of at least two current documents, one issued by a federal or state government and containing the individual’s signature and either a photograph or physical description, and the other by an institution, business entity or state government or the federal government and containing at least the individual’s signature;
  • both forms of ID must be presented while connected to the communication technology;
  • The notary must record the entire proceeding (notarial act) and must keep a copy of the recording for ten (10) years;
  • The signer must affirm that he or she is in Connecticut at the time of execution; and
  • The signer must send the notary the signed documents either by fax or electronic means on the same day the documents were signed.

If the above conditions are met, the notary can notarize the documents and send them back to the signer for use. The notary may also notarize the original document as of the date of execution if the notary receives the original document along with the executed electronic version within thirty (30) days of initial execution.

However, only attorneys licensed in Connecticut can remotely conduct a real estate closing or notarize a self-proving affidavit for a Last Will and Testament.

* Remote notarizations are authorized through June 23, 2020, unless extended, modified or terminated sooner by the Governor.